In My Room

“In My Room” is one of the more vague songs of “The Age of the Understatement”. Because of the unspecified lyrics that Turner and Kane use, it is difficult to decipher what exactly the song may truly mean. To the extent that the lyrics convey, the song is about a girl and a guy who may or may not be in a relationship. They are both sitting in a room together, having a conversation. The man is thinking about all of the things that he does not know about the girl and about all of the things that he could potentially say to her to make her slightly more interested in him. He laughs at himself for his thoughts, and he thinks about all of the other people that would laugh at him if they knew what he had been thinking. The guy and the girl continue on with their meaningless conversation while she flips through the pages of a magazine for the second time during their chat. She is obviously as disinterested in the conversation as he is. He becomes frustrated at their lack of true communication, but realizes that everyone struggles in the same way to make human contact. People simply exchange words, but rarely ever attempt to communicate through their conversations. All he wishes to do is to appeal to her, but the day ends with him being no closer than he was when he began.
 

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The tune of this song is reminiscent of the films created within the 60s or 70s, possibly even a film of James Bond quality. The fast-paced and ever-quickening orchestral sounds throughout the whole song create a feeling of tension, making the listener feel slightly apprehensive about what may be to come. With the song being only two and a half minutes long, Turner and Kane spend quite a lengthy portion of that time repeating the first line of the chorus. Had the song been longer, this repetition might have been better balanced with the rest of the song. Due to its short length, it becomes slightly overused, but perhaps Turner and Kane purposefully did this in order to stress the line’s importance within the song.

Peter Marsden 2010 All Rights Reserved